Wpisy

Linux Kernel 5.5 brings changes to ARM, RISC-V and MIPS

At the end of last week, Linus Torvalds brought a complete list of Linux 5.5 changes for ARM, MIPS and RISC-V architectures. Io_uring asynchronous I/O has been improved, adding the ability to modify the set of files being operated on without starting over, user-specifiable completion-ring sizes, absolute timeouts, and support for accept() calls among others.

Also the Airtime Queue Limits (AQL) for WiFi that make CoDel work more effectively with wireless drivers that utilized firmware/hardware offloading. KUnit unit testing framework for the Linux kernel with tests can now be run locally on a developer’s workstation without any VM or special hardware. Another change is SMB rootfs and multichannel support using SMB as root file systems, and support for using multiple network connections for the same SMB session.

For more information about changes to different architectures, check out the article exploring the subject: https://www.cnx-software.com/2020/01/27/linux-5-5-release-main-changes-arm-mips-and-risc-v-architectures/

Linux 5.5 changes announcement

So this last week was pretty quiet, and while we had a late network update with some (mainly iwl wireless) network driver and netfilter module loading fixes, David didn’t think that warranted another -rc. And outside of that, it’s really been very quiet indeed – there’s a panfrost driver update too, but again it didn’t really seem to make sense to delay the final release by another week.

Outside of those, it’s all really tiny, even if some of those tiny changes touched some core files.

So despite the slight worry that the holidays might have affected the schedule, 5.5 ended up with the regular rc cadence and is out now.

That means that the merge window for 5.6 will open tomorrow, and I already have a couple of pull requests pending. The timing for this next merge window isn’t optimal for me – I have some travel and other things going on during the same two weeks, but hopefully it won’t be all that noticeable. But there might be random timezones, odd hours, and random delays because of that. I try to avoid scheduling things during the merge window, but hey, it doesn’t always work out, and I’d have to delay things by two weeks to avoid the conflicts, which just doesn’t seem worth it.

Particularly since it’s not necessarily going to be a problem to begin with. We’ll see.

Anyway. Go out and test 5.5, and start sending me those pull requests for all the new development that is ready,

Source: https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/1/26/232

Ubuntu 19.10 for latest Raspberry Pi applications

With 19.10 release of Ubuntu Server, Canonical announced official support for the Raspberry Pi 4. The latest board from the Raspberry Pi Foundation sports a faster system-on-a-chip with a processor that uses the Cortex-A72 architecture (quad-core 64-bit ARMv8 at 1.5GHz). Additionally, it offers up to 4GB of RAM. We are supporting the Raspberry Pi 4 to give developers access to a low-cost board, powerful enough to consolidate compute workloads at the edge. 

The Raspberry Pi has established itself as a most accessible platform for innovators in the embedded space. Canonical is dedicated to empowering innovators with open-source software. Consequently, Canonical endeavors to offer full official support for all the boards in the Raspberry Pi family. Canonical will therefore enable both Ubuntu Server and Ubuntu Core for existing and upcoming Pi boards.

Ubuntu Roadmap. Source: https://ubuntu.com/blog/roadmap-for-official-support-for-the-raspberry-pi-4

Industrial use of Raspberry Pi 4

A year ago, TECHBASE released an updated version of the ModBerry M500 industrial IoT computer, replacing the aging Raspberry Pi 3 with a 3B+, giving it better performance. With the recent launch of the Raspberry Pi 4, TECHBASE has yet again, announced another upgrade to the M500, which now packs the latest single-board computer.

Raspberry Pi 4

Over 10 million Raspberry Pi’s have been sold and the Raspberry Pi is likely to stay as a new standard in the industry. Official Raspbian OS is free operating system based on Linux Debian optimized for the Raspberry Pi comes with over 35,000 packages, pre-compiled software bundled in a nice format for easy installation. ModBerry devices are compatible with Raspberry Pi accessories, supported by Raspberry Pi Foundation. ModBerry M500 now with Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ / Raspberry Pi 4 Model B support.

New industrial single-board computer from Banana Pi

A new industrial-class single-board computer, called Banana Pi BPI-F2S, was released with Linux 4.19. Banana Pi BPI-F2S is a new SBC from BPI Tech – a daughter company of SinoVoIP. The heart of Banana Pi BPI-F2S is the SP7021 chip from SunPlus containing a 1GHz Cortex-A7 quad-core ARM processor, A962 type ARM coprocessor and 8051 controller. More information about the SP7021 chip is available in the Wiki.

Industrial Banana Pi BPI-F2S
Banana Pi BPI-F2S

For storage, the Banana Pi BPI-F2S has an 8 GB eMMC flash and a microSD card slot. Here is the rest of the list of specifications:

  • Video output: HDMI 1.4
  • I / F camera: MIPI CSI connector
  • Connectivity: two 10/100 Ethernet
  • USB: two USB 2.0 ports, one micro USB port
  • Power supply: 12 VDC
  • Expansion: 40-pin GPIO compatible with Raspberry Pi
  • Two 50-pin FPGA interfaces for Trenz Electronic Trix Electronic TE0725LP-01-100-2D Artix 7 board

Banana Pi BPI-F2S a new industrial SoC on the market

SunPlus SP7021 is a revolutionary SoC that has the power of a Linux-grade chip and the integration simplicity of a microcontroller. With ARM Cortex-A7 Quad core, ARM926 real-time core. Designed by Sunplus Technology in collaboration with Tibbo Technology, PLUS1 takes all the sophisticated elements typically found in modern industrial-grade embedded Linux chips, adds a plethora of features targeting IoT and industrial control applications, and delivers the resulting design in a simple microcontroller-like package that needs few external components, simplifies the schematic diagram, and reduces the PCB complexity.”

Industrial Banana Pi BPI-F2S
Banana Pi BPI-F2S (SP7021)

SP7021 is a SoC solution of industrial control. It meets customers’ full demand on function but with low cost so that will improve customers’ competitiveness in the market. SP7021 provides rich GPIOs, storage and USB interface. And it provides MIPI CSI interface for video input and HDMI interface for video output. It also provides FPGA interface for function extension. SP7021 also has 4 Ethernet ports providing customers a high competitive solution.

Source: https://www.hackster.io/bananapi/banana-pi-bpi-f2s-with-sunplus-sp7021-chip-design-e108ff

Industrial use of previous BananaPi-like development boards

Introduced in November 2017, the ModBerry M300 series, based on NanoPi NEO revolutionised the economic segment of Industrial IoT devices and proved, that automation and monitoring can be done effectively with low expenditure on industrial installations.

ModBerry M300 O1 based on OrangePi Zero Plus features Allwinner H5 (Quad-core Cortex-A53) SoC, moderate 512MB RAM, storage memory option with microSD slot, USB and Gigabit Ethernet port. The wireless communication is supported with onboard Wi-Fi module.

Offering much higher performance and wider feature range, the ModBerry M300 O2 features same SoC as M300 series, but thanks to OrangePi Zero Plus2 means, the device is equipped with onboard 8GB eMMC, extra microSD expansion slot as alternative and wired/wireless interfaces, e.g. HDMI, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0.

Arduino Portenta H7 - new player on the Industrial IoT market

At the Consumer Electronics Show 2020, Arduino has made a possibly groundbreaking announcement with the Arduino Pro IDE. This could bring the maker scene and classic industrial companies closer together.

Arduino Portenta H7 features

The Portenta H7 is equipped with an STM32H747Xi with a Cortex-M7 and a Cortex-M4. Portenta H7 has 2 megabytes of RAM and a 16 MByte NOR flash. An SD card can be connected via an adapter. The connection to a wireless network is via WiFi 802.11 b/g/n or Bluetooth 5.1. The charging electronics for a 3.7 volt LiPo battery are already integrated.

With the Arduino Portenta H7, the first model of the new Portenta family was announced. This should be tailored specifically to the needs of industrial applications, AI and robotics scenarios.

Arduino Portenta H7
Arduino Portenta H7

The model is equipped with two 80-pin connectors, plus four UART ports. USB Type-C port can output image signals via DisplayPort. The Portenta H7 is also programmable with an interpreter in MicroPython, JavaScript and TensorFlow Light. The single-platinum calculator should be available from February for 90 euros.

Source: https://www.linuxinsider.com/story/86448.html

What the world says about Arduino Portenta?

Fabio Violante, CEO of Arduino, said manufacturers will be able to create modules for robotics, 3D printer and more:

Portenta H7 is directly compatible with other Arduino libraries and offers new features that will benefit hardware manufacturers, such as a DisplayPorl output, much faster ADC multi-channel and high-speed timers.

Arduino Portenta Carrier
Arduino Portenta Carrier

Meanwhile, Charlene Marini, vice president of strategy for Arm’s IoT Services Group commented:

SMEs with industrial requirements require simplified development through secure development tools, software and hardware to economically realize their IoT use cases.

ARM Partnership cooperation

ARM works with Arduino to provide secure, easy-to-manage and manageable devices to a wide range of programmers. Two innovations to date show the results of this partnership.

„Mbed OS Portenty is one of the concrete achievements of the partnership,” said Marini. „Another example is the Arduino SIM card, which uses Pelion connection management.”

She said companies have the ability to provide secure Internet of Things on a large scale. This is the foundation of machine learning, automation and the rapid evolution of applications that cross the physical and digital world.

eModGATE with ESP32

Industrial use of Arduino-like solutions

One of industrial IoT devices, supporting Arduino-like technology is eModGATE from TECHBASE. Economical, ESP32-based solution can serve as an end-point in any installation or works well as a gateway, gathering data from scattered sensor mesh across the installation. For more information check Industrial IoT Shop with all the configuration options for eModGATE.

Latest NanoPi R2S Dual Gigabit Ethernet SBC & Router

The new NanoPi R2S is based on the Rockchip RK3328 processor, adding system memory, including 1 GB DDR4 RAM, and is designed to support 4G LTE via the Huawei 8372H-155 USB dongle. R2S is equipped with two Gigabit Ethernet ports (with one deployed for WAN and the other for LAN). This board can surely be used in industrial and Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Most features resemble an update, but NanoPi R2S does not have built-in Wi-Fi for unknown reasons and certainly seems to be a downgrade. However, instead of built-in WiFi, friendlyELEC recommends using the RTL8821CU USB dongle, which is immediately supported with the default firmware.

NanoPi NEO2 Black specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3328 quad-core Cortex-A53 @ 1.5 GHz with Arm Mali-450MP2
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR4 RAM
  • Storage – MicroSD Slot, SPI flash footprint
  • 1x Gigabit Ethernet (WAN) up to 941 Mbps (measured)
  • 1x Gigabit Ethernet (LAN) up to 941 Mbps (measured) via Realtek RTL8153 USB 3.0 to Ethernet controller
  • USB – 1x USB Type-A host port, 1x micro USB port (power + slave)
  • Debugging – 3-pin 2.54mm pitch header for serial console
  • Expansion – 10-pin GPIO header with GPIOs, I2C, UART, IR_Rx, 5V, 3.3V and GND
  • Misc – 3x LEDs (WAN, LAN, SYS), K1 reset button, fan header
  • Power Supply – 5VDC/3A via micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 55.6 x 52mm
  • Temperature Range – -20℃ to 70℃

Source: https://www.cnx-software.com/2020/01/16/nanopi-r2s-dual-gigabit-ethernet-sbc-router-is-powered-by-rockchip-rk3328-soc/

NanoPi R2S layout
NanoPi R2S layout

Industrial use of previous OrangePi development boards

Introduced in November 2017, the ModBerry M300 series, based on NanoPi NEO revolutionised the economic segment of Industrial IoT devices and proved, that automation and monitoring can be done effectively with low expenditure on industrial installations.

ModBerry M300 O1 based on OrangePi Zero Plus features Allwinner H5 (Quad-core Cortex-A53) SoC, moderate 512MB RAM, storage memory option with microSD slot, USB and Gigabit Ethernet port. The wireless communication is supported with onboard Wi-Fi module.

Offering much higher performance and wider feature range, the ModBerry M300 O2 features same SoC as M300 series, but thanks to OrangePi Zero Plus2 means, the device is equipped with onboard 8GB eMMC, extra microSD expansion slot as alternative and wired/wireless interfaces, e.g. HDMI, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0.

Ubuntu Touch for Raspberry Pi 7-inch display

UBPorts community has released an update claiming to support Ubuntu Touch running on a Raspberry Pi 3 with an official 7-inch Raspberry Pi touchscreen. The Raspberry Pi is growing as the Ubuntu Touch programming platform, says UBports founder Marius Gripsgård in the attached video below. However, there was no demo. In this film, UBports creator Florian Leeber added that the Raspberry Pi platform can also serve as the home touch interface for the Internet of Things and other applications.

The key to Pi support is the recent merger of the libhybris project and ARM64 at the “edge” that points to the repository used by the project. This should also facilitate portability to other Arm-based platforms.

A new feature of Ubuntu Touch is the ability to run a Mir display server in Wayland using the Wayland protocol. It is said to enable user session suspension, save battery life, and improve security and privacy. This work has improved the handling of Bluetooth headsets with the upgrade to the BlueZ Bluetooth daemon and PulseAudio patch.

Ubuntu Touch’s way to 64-bit IoT applications

Ubuntu Touch is a special version of Ubuntu, which was designed for mobile devices with touch screens, and more specifically for smartphones and tablets. Unfortunately, Ubuntu was abandoned before conquering the market. However, as is the case in the Open Source world, someone has taken over and developed this project. Ubuntu Touch has just been released in the 64-bit version.

Just two years ago, Canonical was working hard on the Unity8 graphics environment and the Mir display server. Work on these projects was already in a fairly deep stage, and the British giant was tempted to add Unity8 to one of the Ubuntu versions. Unfortunately, at this point the environment was – to put it mildly – infinite and did not work very well (at least in my case). How does it connect with Ubuntu Touch? Well, Ubuntu Touch also used Unity8 and Mir, and both platforms – Desktop PC and mobile – were to be unified. Unfortunately, to the surprise of project enthusiasts, Canonical decided to abandon their work and after a few years of separation return to GNOME and leave the mobile world completely.

It is true that Canonical abandoned their projects, but there was another team that wanted to take them in. We are talking about the UBports group, which is gradually updating Ubuntu Touch and spending them on new models.

Ubuntu Touch. Source: https://twitter.com/UBports

After months of announcements, the Ubuntu Touch project finally got a 64-bit compilation. Earlier, even operating on a suitable processor, this system operated only in 32-bit mode. This is a big step forward, although the compatibility list typically fails.

The change in the UI range will only be introduced by the OTA-12 update, anticipated for an undefined future. But with Ubuntu Touch 64-bit debuts Telegram client – TELEports 0.6.0.

The creators admit that they delayed 64-bit binaries, considering them unnecessary, especially for equipment with less than 4 GB RAM. Now, however, according to new observations, they have changed their minds. Of course, the system itself is not everything. You still need to recompile the apps. But this is to take place successively, based on the base in the form of an already operating system.

Ubuntu Touch for Raspberry Pi Compute Module?

Will Raspberry Pi Compute Module powered solutions get a support for Ubuntu Touch? Maybe the transition to 3rd party devices will be seamless, because of Ubuntu Touch already working on official Raspberry Pi 7-inch display. Similiar soliutions, such as TECHBASE’s TECHPANEL P500 with Compute Module 3/3+ support might be the first device with fully working Ubuntu Touch.

TECHPANEL P500 with CM3/3+ support. Source: https://iiot-shop.com/product/techpanel-p500/