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Raspberry Pi based controller with Modbus, M-Bus & MQTT support

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ based ModBerry industrial computer series use latest Compute Module 3+, powered by Quad-core Cortex-A53 1.2GHz processor, 1024MB LPDDR2 RAM and up to 32GB Flash eMMC. The module increase the device’s performance up to ten times, maintaining low power consumption and optimal price of the solution. Raspberry Pi based ModBerry features industrial protocol support, e.g. Modbus, M-Bus, SNMP, MQTT and the possibility to add new protocols with ease.

ModBerry protocol modularity

ModBerry remote management

The iMod platform guarantees a quick start and full use of the ModBerry computer, without the need to write complicated software. One of the main advantages of the iMod platform is its ease of use and variety of available functionalities. Due to the available SDK, the platform can be extended with new, dedicated functionalities.

iMod can be installed directly onto ModBerry device or using external PC outside the installation (iModBOX). The third option is using dedicated hosting server to host the iMod software (iModHOST).

iModCloud Ecosystem

Another product is iModCloud software-service, which enables full control of ModBerry/iMod devices. Together they form a stand-alone solution – iModCloud Ecosystem, a combination of cloud services with web-based user interface and industrial devices, fully manageable remotely.

iModCloud can be hosted externally, using stable DELL servers to host the cloud service.(iModCloudHOST). For higher data security or depending on project features, iModCloud can be hosted internally, inside the installation (iModCloudBOX) hosted by the dedicated Mini-PC or from portable memory stick (iModCloudSTARTER).

More information Raspberry Pi based industrial device

TECHBASE provides solutions for industrial automation, telemetry, remote access and integration with IT systems. Since 2012 the company has been actively developing its competences in the market. Due to an innovative approach – based on the use of cutting-edge technologies, open standards and easy to maintain products – the company has earned the trust of Customers all over the world.

TECHBASE’s mission is to provide our Customers with tools, which will shorten and simplify the process of system implementation. With open architecture and high level of configurability, maintenance of a system is not expensive anymore.

To read more about ModBerry 500 M3 solution, download PDF datasheet: http://a2s.pl/products/ModBerry/ModBerry_500M3_EN.pdf
Read more about all ModBerry Industrial Solutions at: https://modberry.techbase.eu/

ModBerry hardware modularity

ModBerry 500 hardware modularity

The main features of ModBerry Industrial Computers series are the extension capabilities to increase input/output number, add up to 4 internal wireless communication modems and modules, support additional features such as accelerometer or opto-isolation options.

ModBerry 500 series offers wide range of industrial interfaces e.g.: digital inputs/outputs, analog inputs/outputs, relay outputs, serial RS-232/485 ports, Ethernet, 1-Wire, CAN, USB 2.0, HDMI, LTE/3G/GPRS, NarrowBand IoT/LTE, GPS, ZigBee, WiFi, Bluetooth, LoRa and many more via extension modules.

New industrial grade touch panel with Raspberry Pi

Latest addition to Industrial IoT Ecosystem from TECHBASE is TECHPANEL P500 is an industrial-grade touch panel automation controller for wide range of industrial installations. Equipped with up to date Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3/3+ or Compute Module 3/3+ Lite, 7” capacitive touch display and IP65 hermetic casing with cast gaskets, can be used in harsh conditions of industrial applications.

Raspberry Pi based touch panel features

New TECHPANEL P500 M3/3+ is powered by quad-core Cortex-A53 1.2GHz processor with 1GB RAM and up to 32GB eMMC or 8GB microSD flash memory. Wide range of modems and extra wireline/wireless interfaces via expansion cards makes the TECHPANEL micro-computer a versatile addition to Industrial IoT solutions offered by TECHBASE company.

TECHPANEL devices can easily work remotely with existing ModBerry Gateways & Moduino ESP32 Edge Controllers for data accumulation and monitoring, to perform specific actions before sending the data to cloud services. TECHPANEL with ModuinoModBerry installation can work as standalone Ecosystem (for example via MQTT), providing complex data management solution to any installation.

TECHPANEL P500 M3+ with Compute Module 3+ from Raspberry Pi
TECHPANEL P500 M3+ with Compute Module 3+ from Raspberry Pi

Visual management and available Raspbian OS

The device is equipped with compact 800 x 480 px 7-inch TFT panel with 10 points capacitive touch to allow the user to perform direct actions on-site. With IP65 casing and extended working temperature range, TECHPANEL can be placed almost everywhere.

Over 23 million Raspberry Pi’s have been sold and the Raspberry Pi is likely to stay as a new standard in the industry. Official Raspbian OS is free operating system based on Linux Debian optimized for the Raspberry Pi comes with over 35,000 packages, pre-compiled software bundled in a nice format for easy installation.

TECHPANEL P500 M3+ with Compute Module 3+ from Raspberry Pi
TECHPANEL P500 M3+ with Compute Module 3+ from Raspberry Pi

SPECIFICATION

  • Cortex A53 1.2GHz Processor
  • RAM 1GB, eMMC up to 32GB
  • 7″ TFT screen (800x600px)
  • Capactitive touch screen (10-point)
  • Wide range of expansion modules (Ethernet, RS-232/485/422,  Digital and Analog I/Os, Relay, M-Bus, CAN, optoisolated I/Os, Accelerometer, etc.)
  • Wide range of wireless modules (GPRS/EDGE, 3G/LTE, NarrowBand-IoT, GPS, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, LoRa, ZigBee, Z-Wave, Sigfox, Wireless M-Bus, etc.)
  • Water-Resistant casing (IP65)
  • Operating temperature: -20°C ~ 70°C
  • Optional SD card support instead of eMMC Flash

With latest Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, the Raspberry Foundation added NVMe SSD support via M.2 (PCIe 2.0) interface. Jeff Geerling tested 3 piece M.2 SSD RAID array which is another example how Compute Module 4 is a milestone in IoT applications.

SSD/eMMC benchmark scores for Compute Module 4

With the debut of Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and ModBerry 500 CM4 from TECHBASE, another addition came to Industrial Controllers and Edge Automation. New module carried the likelihood to associate NVMe SSD module by means of M.2 slot utilizing PCIe 2.0 interface.

We took our ModBerry 500 CM4 device, utililizing latest Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and carried two test:

  • eMMC built-in standard Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4
  • selected NVMe SSD via M.2 slot

Both eMMC and SSD drive perfomed truly well, accomplishing extremely high benchmark score: 5078 for eMMC and unbelivable 13807 for NVM. SSD. For direct correlation, you can check a few tests performed by over 20.000 clients of this benchmark here: https://jamesachambers.com/2020s-fastest-raspberry-pi-4-storage-sd-ssd-benchmarks/?amp

Score of eMMC on ModBerry 500 CM4
Score of NVMe SSD on ModBerry 500 CM4

More benchmark scores can be found here: https://storage.jamesachambers.com/

Order next batch of Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 devices

TECHBASE’s ModBerry 500 series has gotten an update to Compute Module 4 and is accessible for pre-orders. TECHBASE is leading producer of Industrial Raspberry Pi and Industrial Compute Module applications. ModBerry 500 series is completely viable with all arrivals of Compute Module from Rasbperry Pi Foundation.

Primary highlights of refreshed device are:

  • up to 4x quicker eMMC Flash with up to 32GB capacity
  • up to 2x quicker execution than recent CM3 rendition with quad-center Cortex-A72 4×1.5GHz
  • up to 8x more RAM (8GB LPDDR4)
  • 1Gbit Ethernet interface
  • discretionary PCIe card support for NVMe SSD by M.2
  • discretionary second PCIe support for remote modem arrangements, for example 5G modems

First group of ModBerry 500 CM4 devices has just been dispatched, we are gathering orders for next batch. Hustle just a bit to get your devices rapidly!

With the debut of Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and ModBerry 500 CM4 from TECHBASE, another addition came to Industrial Controllers and Edge Automation. New module carried the likelihood to associate NVMe SSD module by means of M.2 slot utilizing PCIe 2.0 interface.

SSD/eMMC benchmark scores for Compute Module 4

We took our ModBerry 500 CM4 device, utililizing latest Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and carried two test:

  • eMMC built-in standard Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4
  • selected NVMe SSD via M.2 slot

Both eMMC and SSD drive perfomed truly well, accomplishing extremely high benchmark score: 5078 for eMMC and unbelivable 13807 for NVM. SSD. For direct correlation, you can check a few tests performed by over 20.000 clients of this benchmark here: https://jamesachambers.com/2020s-fastest-raspberry-pi-4-storage-sd-ssd-benchmarks/?amp

Score of eMMC on ModBerry 500 CM4
Score of NVMe SSD on ModBerry 500 CM4

More benchmark scores can be found here: https://storage.jamesachambers.com/

Order next batch of Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 devices

TECHBASE’s ModBerry 500 series has gotten an update to Compute Module 4 and is accessible for pre-orders. TECHBASE is leading producer of Industrial Raspberry Pi and Industrial Compute Module applications. ModBerry 500 series is completely viable with all arrivals of Compute Module from Rasbperry Pi Foundation.

Primary highlights of refreshed device are:

  • up to 4x quicker eMMC Flash with up to 32GB capacity
  • up to 2x quicker execution than recent CM3 rendition with quad-center Cortex-A72 4×1.5GHz
  • up to 8x more RAM (8GB LPDDR4)
  • 1Gbit Ethernet interface
  • discretionary PCIe card support for NVMe SSD by M.2
  • discretionary second PCIe support for remote modem arrangements, for example 5G modems

First group of ModBerry 500 CM4 devices has just been dispatched, we are gathering orders for next batch. Hustle just a bit to get your devices rapidly!

UPDATE 22.10.20: ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 4 available for pre-order

TECHBASE’s ModBerry industrial computer series has received an update to Compute Module 4 and is available for pre-orders. TECHBASE is leading manufacturer of Industrial Raspberry Pi and Industrial Compute Module solutions. ModBerry 500 series is fully compatible with all releases of Compute Module from Rasbperry Pi foundation.

Main features of updated device are:

  • up to 4x faster eMMC Flash with up to 32GB storage
  • up to 2x faster performance of CPU apllications than previous CM3 version
  • up to 8x more RAM (8GB LPDDR4)
  • optional 1Gbit Ethernet interface
  • optional PCIe card support for NVMe SSD drive (via M.2)
  • optional second PCIe support for wireless modem solutions

First orders will be ready with subject to the availability of the CM4 module itself.

A day ago, Raspberry Foundation announced new member of its family, a Rasbperry Pi Compute Module 4. It’s quite obvious, even from the first look, that the new module is very different from its predecessors. Main difference is a new form factor, leaving DDR2 SODIMM in the past.

The same 64-bit quad-core BCM2711 application processor as in Raspberry Pi 4B, the Compute Module 4 brings higher performance: faster CPU cores, better multimedia, more interfacing capabilities, and, for the first time, a choice of RAM densities and a wireless Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity options.

Compute Module 4 comes in 32 variants. Lite, as always, offers no eMMC memory, a and standard versions come with up to 8GB RAM, 32 eMMC Flash and wireless modem.

New Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 in new form factor

New features of Compute Module 4

  • 1.5GHz quad-core 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU as in Raspberry Pi 4 version B
  • 1GB, 2GB, 4GB or 8GB LPDDR4-3200 SDRAM
  • 8GB, 16GB or 32GB eMMC Flash storage for Standard version, Lite version without eMMC
  • Optional 2.4GHz and 5GHz IEEE 802.11b/g/n/ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 5.0
  • Single-lane PCI Express 2.0 interface
  • Gigabit Ethernet PHY with IEEE 1588 support
  • Dual HDMI interfaces, at resolutions up to 4K
  • 28 GPIO pins, with up to 6 × UART, 6 × I2C and 5 × SPI

Source: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-compute-module-4/

Compute Module 4 cutting edge in Industrial IoT

Few months ago IoT Industrial Devices predicted a possible release date for Compute Module 4 in Standard and Lite version:

Upcoming Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 possible release date
Raspberry Pi release timeline with probable Compute Module 4 release date

First Rasbperry Pi 1B model had it’s analogy in industrial Compute Module 1 after almost 2 years from it’s premiere. Compute Module 2 was probably omitted because the change from RPi1 to RPI2 mainly involved a minor change of the processor (Cortex-A7 900MHz), which was almost immediately replaced with Cortex-A53 1.2GHz in Raspberry Pi 3.

The premiere of Compute Module 3 occured a year after RPI 3 announcement, providing a significant boost of industrial market solutions. Since Raspberry Pi 4 was a great success in 2019, we might see it’s equivalent in industrial series of Raspberry Pi – Compute Module 4. A possible release date of Raspberry Pi’s Compute Module 4 is mid-2020.

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 high-density connector

Raspberry Pi is gaining recognition in Industry

Almost a year ago, in the beginning of 2019, Raspberry Pi Foundation presented Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, a successor to previous CM3 version of development board, aimed at businesses and industrial users. The Compute Module uses a standard DDR2 SODIMM (small outline dual in-line memory module) form factor. GPIO and other I/O functions are routed through the 200 pins on the board.

Only a few months later, in June 2019, came big premiere of Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, the long-awaited successor of customer RPi3+. With new processor, larger RAM options and many input/output changes, became new standard in small, embedded PC world.

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+
Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+

It seems a matter of time before the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ will get its own successor, probably called Compute Module 4, a new milestone of professional embedded IoT module. What might be the specification of this highly expected development board?

Industrial use of Compute Module

With Compute Module 3+ options from Raspberry Pi, TECHBASE upgraded their ModBerry 500/9500 industrial computers. From now on the ModBerry 500/9500 can be supported with extended eMMC, up to 32GB. Higher memory volume brings new features available for ModBerry series.

 ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+
ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+

Higher performance of ModBerry 500/9500 with extended eMMC flash memory, up to 32GB , powered by quad-core Cortex A53 processor allows the device to smoothly run Windows 10 IoT Core system, opening up many possibilities for data management, remote control and visualisation.

UPDATE 22.10.20: ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 4 available for pre-order

TECHBASE’s ModBerry industrial computer series has received an update to Compute Module 4 and is available for pre-orders. TECHBASE is leading manufacturer of Industrial Raspberry Pi and Industrial Compute Module solutions. ModBerry 500 series is fully compatible with all releases of Compute Module from Rasbperry Pi foundation.

Main features of updated device are:

  • up to 4x faster eMMC Flash with up to 32GB storage
  • up to 2x faster performance of CPU apllications than previous CM3 version
  • up to 8x more RAM (8GB LPDDR4)
  • optional 1Gbit Ethernet interface
  • optional PCIe card support for NVMe SSD drive (via M.2)
  • optional second PCIe support for wireless modem solutions

First orders will be ready with subject to the availability of the CM4 module itself.

According to latest leaks about Compute Module 4 specifiaction and features we can be more than sure that:

  • New Compute Module will feature Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on-board! Raspberry Pi Compute Module series will probably include versions with and without these modems to provide modules for variety of industrial applications.
  • PCI-Express line will be available externally to enable extension support via PCIe
  • Ethernet support will be enabled, most probably 1Gbps, since it is a standard in latest Raspberry Pi 4B.
  • 5x UART will be available to Compute Module 4 users

Official Raspberry Pi’s information about upcoming Compute Module 4

In recent interview with Eben Upton, the CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading, we finally had Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 release confirmation, probably in 2021. He shared some details about the upcoming CM4 features, such as single-lane NVMe support.

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module, CM4, we will support NVMe to some degree on that,  because of course, it [Raspberry Pi 4] has a PCI Express channel. (…) We have a single lane Gen 2 which is used to supply USB 3.0 on the Raspberry Pi [4]. On the [Compute] Module that would be exposed to the edge connector and we’re likely to support NVMe over that.

Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading

Raspberry Pi is gaining recognition in Industry

Almost a year ago, in the beginning of 2019, Raspberry Pi Foundation presented Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, a successor to previous CM3 version of development board, aimed at businesses and industrial users. The Compute Module uses a standard DDR2 SODIMM (small outline dual in-line memory module) form factor. GPIO and other I/O functions are routed through the 200 pins on the board.

Only a few months later, in June 2019, came big premiere of Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, the long-awaited successor of customer RPi3+. With new processor, larger RAM options and PCIe/NVMe support, CM4 might be a black horse of industrial automation in 2021.

It seems a matter of time before the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ will get its own successor, called Compute Module 4, a new milestone of professional embedded IoT module. What might be the specification of this highly expected development board?

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+
Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 probable specification

Compute Module 4 specifications probably will look like these:

  • Broadcom BCM2711, Quad core Cortex-A72 @ 1.5GHz will highly plausible replace previous Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 64-bit SoC @ 1.2GHz,
  • 1GB, 2GB or 4GB LPDDR4-3200 SDRAM will become a standard options, instead of fixed 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM,
  • PCIe/NVMe support via single lane
  • Current flash memory (eMMC) options: 8GB / 16GB / 32GB from CM3+ will probably stay the same,
  • weight and factor will stay the same, to provide a possibility to upgrade current IoT applications of CM3 and CM3+

With much higher performance, the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 will, for sure, support Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0 expansions with PCIe/NVMe single lane. We might even see wider working temperature range, if Raspberry Pi Foundation decides to make some hardware changes, to follow, for example, ESP32 – used in end-point IoT automation.

Industrial use of Compute Module

With Compute Module 3+ options from Raspberry Pi, TECHBASE upgraded their ModBerry 500/9500 industrial computers. From now on the ModBerry 500/9500 can be supported with extended eMMC, up to 32GB. Higher memory volume brings new features available for ModBerry series. Upcoming Raspberry Pi’s Compute Module 4 will be fully compatible with TECHBASE’s ModBerry 500/9500 controllers, oferring extended features.

 ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+
ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+

Higher performance of ModBerry 500/9500 with extended eMMC flash memory, up to 32GB , powered by quad-core Cortex A53 processor allows the device to smoothly run Windows 10 IoT Core system, opening up many possibilities for data management, remote control and visualisation.

UPDATE 22.10.20: ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 4 available for pre-order

TECHBASE’s ModBerry industrial computer series has received an update to Compute Module 4 and is available for pre-orders. TECHBASE is leading manufacturer of Industrial Raspberry Pi and Industrial Compute Module solutions. ModBerry 500 series is fully compatible with all releases of Compute Module from Rasbperry Pi foundation.

Main features of updated device are:

  • up to 4x faster eMMC Flash with up to 32GB storage
  • up to 2x faster performance of CPU apllications than previous CM3 version
  • up to 8x more RAM (8GB LPDDR4)
  • optional 1Gbit Ethernet interface
  • optional PCIe card support for NVMe SSD drive (via M.2)
  • optional second PCIe support for wireless modem solutions

First orders will be ready with subject to the availability of the CM4 module itself.

Update on Raspberry Pi’s Compute Module 4 features [15.10.2020]

According to latest leaks about Compute Module 4 specifiaction and features we can be more than sure that:

  • New Compute Module will feature Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on-board! Raspberry Pi Compute Module series will probably include versions with and without these modems to provide modules for variety of industrial applications.
  • PCI-Express line will be available externally to enable extension support via PCIe
  • Ethernet support will be enabled, most probably 1Gbps, since it is a standard in latest Raspberry Pi 4B.
  • 5x UART will be available to Compute Module 4 users

Official Raspberry Pi’s information about upcoming Compute Module 4

In recent interview with Eben Upton, the CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading, we finally had Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 release confirmation, probably in 2021. He shared some details about the upcoming CM4 features, such as single-lane NVMe support.

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module, CM4, we will support NVMe to some degree on that,  because of course, it [Raspberry Pi 4] has a PCI Express channel. (…) We have a single lane Gen 2 which is used to supply USB 3.0 on the Raspberry Pi [4]. On the [Compute] Module that would be exposed to the edge connector and we’re likely to support NVMe over that.

Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading

First Rasbperry Pi 1B model had it’s analogy in industrial Compute Module 1 after almost 2 years from it’s premiere. Compute Module 2 was probably omitted because the change from RPi1 to RPI2 mainly involved a minor change of the processor (Cortex-A7 900MHz), which was almost immediately replaced with Cortex-A53 1.2GHz in Raspberry Pi 3.

The premiere of Compute Module 3 occured a year after RPI 3 announcement, providing a significant boost of industrial market solutions. Since Raspberry Pi 4 was a great success in 2019, we might see it’s equivalent in industrial series of Raspberry Pi – Compute Module 4. A possible release date of Raspberry Pi’s Compute Module 4 is somewhere inbetween 2020/2021.

Raspberry Pi is gaining recognition in Industry

Almost a year ago, in the beginning of 2019, Raspberry Pi Foundation presented Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, a successor to previous CM3 version of development board, aimed at businesses and industrial users. The Compute Module uses a standard DDR2 SODIMM (small outline dual in-line memory module) form factor. GPIO and other I/O functions are routed through the 200 pins on the board.

Only a few months later, in June 2019, came big premiere of Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, the long-awaited successor of customer RPi3+. With new processor, larger RAM options and PCIe/NVMe support, CM4 might be a black horse of industrial automation in 2021.

It seems a matter of time before the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ will get its own successor, called Compute Module 4, a new milestone of professional embedded IoT module. What might be the specification of this highly expected development board?

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+
Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 probable specification

Compute Module 4 specifications probably will look like these:

  • Broadcom BCM2711, Quad core Cortex-A72 @ 1.5GHz will highly plausible replace previous Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 64-bit SoC @ 1.2GHz,
  • 1GB, 2GB or 4GB LPDDR4-3200 SDRAM will become a standard options, instead of fixed 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM,
  • PCIe/NVMe support via single lane
  • Current flash memory (eMMC) options: 8GB / 16GB / 32GB from CM3+ will probably stay the same,
  • weight and factor will stay the same, to provide a possibility to upgrade current IoT applications of CM3 and CM3+

With much higher performance, the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 will, for sure, support Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0 expansions with PCIe/NVMe single lane. We might even see wider working temperature range, if Raspberry Pi Foundation decides to make some hardware changes, to follow, for example, ESP32 – used in end-point IoT automation.

Industrial use of Compute Module

With Compute Module 3+ options from Raspberry Pi, TECHBASE upgraded their ModBerry 500/9500 industrial computers. From now on the ModBerry 500/9500 can be supported with extended eMMC, up to 32GB. Higher memory volume brings new features available for ModBerry series. Upcoming Raspberry Pi’s Compute Module 4 will be fully compatible with TECHBASE’s ModBerry 500/9500 controllers, oferring extended features.

 ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+
ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+

Higher performance of ModBerry 500/9500 with extended eMMC flash memory, up to 32GB , powered by quad-core Cortex A53 processor allows the device to smoothly run Windows 10 IoT Core system, opening up many possibilities for data management, remote control and visualisation.

Arduino or Raspberry Pi? Pros and cons in IoT use.

Some people consider the Arduino platform to be the best for beginners, however, the novice will handle both Arduino and Raspberry Pi board. The choice between platforms should mainly depend on the characteristics of the project.

The origin of both platfoms

The founder of Arduino is Massimo Banzi, a lecturer at the now-defunct Italian Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, who developed a microcontroller in cooperation with students from this university. The Arduino programming language, based on the Wiring environment and basically on the C/C++ language, was designed by Hernando Barragán, a student of Banzi. The site prepared by Hernando Barragán presents exactly all the work on the project, which clearly shows that this success has more than one father.

In the case of Rasberry Pi, the project also had its source at the university. More specifically, at the University of Cambridge. Three lecturers: Jack Lang, Alan Mycroft and Robert Mullins came up with the idea of ​​developing a simple and above all cheap computer for learning programming. The first prototypes were created between 2006 and 2008. In the next step, seeing the potential of their solution, the men established cooperation with Pete Lamas, an integrated circuit designer at BroadCom, and David Braben, one of the developers of the Elite game, and together they founded the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

As a result, both platforms, which were originally intended to be used for learning by students, due to their low price and simplicity of use, became extremely popular among amateur users of consumer electronics and control, and appeared in mass sales.

So what should you choose – Arduino or Raspberry Pi?

The answer is basically simple – Arduino is ideal for simpler projects. Raspberry Pi will be useful for solutions that require more computing power. Arduino has only 2 kilobytes of RAM. Raspberry Pi has a RAM size of 1 GB. So Arduino is a simple microcontroller, meanwhile Raspberry is actually a small computer. Not without significance is the fact that the Arduino IDE is easier to use than Linux. So if you need a simple control of watering your garden, Arduino will work perfectly. Several sensors and a few lines of code will do the trick. For Raspberry Pi, to achieve the same effect, you will first need to install the system and the necessary libraries. There will be a lot more work and the effect will be the same – watering the garden at a specific time.

So choose Arduino when you need to use a simple solution for frequently repeated activities, e.g. controlling the watering of the garden, switching on and off the external lighting at a specific time, opening the gate, etc. However, because Raspberry can run many tasks at the same time, it is a computer, work simultaneously as a home printer server and operate the monitoring system. Home weather stations are popular and Raspberry will be perfect for this application because of the need to collect information from several sensors (temperature, wind strength, humidity). Raspberry Pi will therefore be a good choice for anyone interested in IoT, i.e. the Internet of Things at home. Examples of ready projects can be found here: https://modberry.techbase.eu/

Why not both?

Nothing prevents you from starting with Arduino and continuing with Raspberry Pi. By using Arduino or ESP32-based solutions you will learn the basics and you will get the effect quickly and relatively easily. But only Rasbperry Pi will allow you to make much more difficult projects. And both platforms can be combined with each other. Arduino/ESP32 can be used to read information from sensors and control e.g. motors (for example a garage door). Raspberry Pi will control all devices and send the collected data, e.g. to a mobile phone. You can do more together.

Power Management HAT with RTC for Raspberry Pi

If you’re looking for a useful tool for long-lasting Raspberry Pi, such as longer battery life or automatic power on / off, this HAT power management is the perfect choice.

This HAT can significantly increase battery life by automatically starting the device for a certain time and automatically switching it off at another time. It can be configured to monitor the Raspberry Pi voltage / current status in real time and turn off the Pi according to the operating status. In addition, the kit includes a convenient power switch for easy on / off (soft shutdown of Pi by software), preventing data loss due to power disconnection.

Raspberry Pi Power Management HAT specification

  • MCU – Microchip ATmega328P-AU MCU
  • Storage – CAT24C32 EEPROM
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for serial communication via CP2102 UART to TTL chip
  • RPi Interface – 40-pin Raspberry Pi GPIO header
  • Misc
    • NXP PCF8523 RTC & calendar chip + CR1220 battery holder
    • DEBUG switch (9) to either:
      1. Power directly Raspberry Pi board
      2. Let the “Arduino” MCU manage the power supply
    • UART selection (15)
      • A – Access Arduino via USB to UART
      • B – Control the Raspberry Pi by Arduino
      • C – Access Raspberry Pi via USB to UART
    • Power/User and Reset buttons
    • Status and Power LEDs
  • Power Supply
    • PH2.0 connector for 7~28V regulated power supply or lithium battery
    • Monolithic Power MP1584 switching regulator
    • Protection circuits such as reverse-polarity, overcurrent, etc…
    • Voltage/current monitoring circuits
  • Dimensions – 65 x 56.5 mm (Raspberry Pi HAT)

Source: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/12/18/raspberry-pi-power-management-hat-adds-rtc-battery-management-software-on-off/

Industrial use of Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+

With Compute Module 3+ options from Raspberry Pi, TECHBASE upgraded their ModBerry 500/9500 industrial computers. From now on the ModBerry 500/9500 can be supported with extended eMMC, up to 32GB. Higher memory volume brings new features available for ModBerry series. One of the options is SuperCap power support.

 ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+
ModBerry 500 with Compute Module 3+

Higher performance of ModBerry 500/9500 with extended eMMC flash memory, up to 32GB , powered by quad-core Cortex A53 processor allows the device to smoothly run Windows 10 IoT Core system, opening up many possibilities for data management, remote control and visualisation.

LoRa vs NarrowBand-IoT. What is better for Industrial IoT?

Low-power wide-area (LPWA) technology meets the needs of multiple IoT markets for low-cost devices that maintain long battery life and low-cost, large-area networks that support large numbers of connections. However, LoRa (LoRaWAN) and NarrowBand-IoT have the most momentum and will gain the largest share in the LPWA market in the next few years.

Many technology articles compare LoRa and NB-IoT technologies as if they were battling it out for dominance in the IoT market. In reality, these technologies are two branches within an emerging technology ecosystem. Similar to WiFi and Bluetooth, they will most likely to diverge into different niches, rather than directly compete with each other. This article will dive deeper into the capabilities, costs, longevity, maturity, and other differentiators of NB-IoT and LoRa-based technology.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/nb-iot-vs-lora-its-ecosystem-race-art-reed

Sigfox/LoRa and NB-IoT in direct comparison

As a result of the research, performed by Tauron, it was found that SigFox and LoRaWAN technologies have limited applications due to the use of the unlicensed ISM band (868 MHz). In addition, each of the three technologies tested has a limit on the transmission channel speed. LoRaWAN, unlike others, allows the construction of an autonomous, separate network dedicated to the needs of the owner.

LTE NarrowBand-IoT technology, as a 3GPP standard, is being increasingly implemented by subsequent mobile operators in the world and in European countries like Poland. For example, polish main frequencies of NB-IoT implementation are 800 MHz and 900 MHz, which allows achieving high coverage of the country.

Research carried out by Tauron has shown that, considering the security of the solution, the availability of telecommunications infrastructure, or the speed of data transmission (important for meter reading), LTE NB IoT technology is closest to use in the energy sector.

Source: https://www.telko.in/tauron-lepiej-ocenia-nb-iot-niz-lora-i-sigfox

Both LoRa and NB-IoT standards were developed to improve security, power efficiency, and interoperability for IoT devices. Each features bidirectional communication (meaning the network can send data to the IoT device, and the IoT device can send data back), and both are designed to scale well, from a few devices to millions of devices.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/nb-iot-vs-lora-its-ecosystem-race-art-reed

Use of LoRa/NB-IoT in industrial automation

Use of wireless connection makes life and work easier for us every day – from radio stations and GSM to Wi-Fi wireless networks, Zigbee, short-range Bluetooth connectivity and LoRa / NarrowBand-IoT wireless solutions. With the spread of internet access, the possibility of using wireless connectivity for a new type of service and application has opened.

ModBerry 500 / ModBerry 9500

Device equipped with LoRa module is delivered with a LoRaWAN protocol stack, so it can be easily connected to the existing, fast-growing LoRa Alliance infrastructure – both in privately managed local area networks (LAN) and public telecommunications networks to create wide area low power WAN (LPWAN) on a national scale. LoRaWAN stack integration also allows connection to any microcontroller, such as ModBerry industrial device from TECHBASE. Such solutions offer also NarrowBand-IoT and full 4G/LTE support.